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Author Archive: Gareth D Jones

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Zodiac (The Eco-Thriller) by Neal Stephenson (book review)

July 13, 2020 | By | Reply More
Zodiac (The Eco-Thriller) by Neal Stephenson  (book review)

Written in 1988 before the publication of his other various well-known, award-winning and huge novels, ‘Zodiac’ is Neal Stephenson’s fast-paced and irreverent eco-thriller that mixes organic chemistry with environmental campaigning and zany humour to produce an indefinable cocktail of a novel. The version of the book I received an ARC of Subterranean Press’s 2010 hardcover […]

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Stormblood by Jeremy Szal (book review).

June 22, 2020 | By | Reply More
Stormblood by Jeremy Szal (book review).

I met Jeremy Szal briefly at WorldCon in Dublin last year. That’s all there is to that story I’m afraid. ‘Stormblood’ is his debut novel, a 500-page military, crime, action, slightly gothic, space opera thriller of epic scale and gritty detail. The front cover presents a futuristic Gotham-Cityesque panorama with the brooding figure of Vakov […]

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Dark Orbit by Carolyn Ives Gilman (book review).

June 6, 2020 | By | Reply More
Dark Orbit by Carolyn Ives Gilman (book review).

It’s difficult to come up with a truly original and unique human society in which to set your story. Even when writing about other planets and other times, we tend to end up with societies that have some basis in current or past human cultures. Authors who invent new alien species can often have more […]

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Critical Point (Cas Russell book 3) by S.L. Huang (book review).

May 25, 2020 | By | Reply More
Critical Point (Cas Russell book 3) by S.L. Huang (book review).

‘Critical Point’ is the third Cas Russell novel by S.L. Huang, a mathematics graduate and stuntwoman who has used her experience to create the unlikely yet fabulously effective mathematical genius mercenary/private detective Cas Russell. As the novel begins, it becomes obvious that Cas has at some point lost her memory and also that her colleagues […]

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Sea Change by Nancy Kress (book review).

May 22, 2020 | By | Reply More
Sea Change by Nancy Kress (book review).

In the not-too-distant future, the world is looking rather fragile following an economic crash, rising sea levels and massive food shortages that have followed on from a backlash against genetically modified organisms. Idealistic young campaigner-for-anything Renata Black lives through the momentous upheavals in society, seen via flashbacks, and becomes a member of the Org, a […]

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The Disestablishment Of Paradise by Philip Mann (book review).

May 19, 2020 | By | Reply More
The Disestablishment Of Paradise by Philip Mann (book review).

A book of wonderful imagery and almost mystical storytelling, Phillip Mann’s ‘The Disestablishment Of Paradise’ takes us on a magical journey of the far future where one of mankind’s colony worlds is being abandoned and left to nature. It’s not for the sake of nature that this disestablishment of the colony is taking place. After […]

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Of Ants And Dinosaurs by Cixin Liu (book review).

May 7, 2020 | By | Reply More
Of Ants And Dinosaurs by Cixin Liu (book review).

Cixin Liu is well known for his big concept novels, hard Science Fiction and far-future extrapolations: ‘The Three Body Problem’, ‘Ball Lightning’ and ‘The Supernova Era’ being the novels already translated into English. His latest work to be translated, ‘Of Ants And Dinosaurs’ comes as somewhat of a surprise then. It is literally a book […]

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Immobility by Brian Evenson (book review).

April 30, 2020 | By | Reply More
Immobility by Brian Evenson (book review).

I’ve read quite a few post-apocalyptic tales and there are certain things you come to expect: bleak landscapes, dust, desperados eking out an existence, rubble and debris. Brian Evenson’s novel ‘Immobility’ has all those things but starts from a unusual position and paints a dire picture of the future that is more bizarre than most. […]

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By Force Alone by Lavie Tidhar (book review).

April 6, 2020 | By | Reply More
By Force Alone by Lavie Tidhar (book review).

In recent years there were a couple of films that purported to tell the more historically accurate stories behind such legendary figures as King Arthur and Robin Hood. For those who like a Robin Hood or King Arthur story, they were a bit of a disappointment. In ‘By Force Alone’, Lavie Tidhar retells the legend […]

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War Of The Maps by Paul McAuley (book review).

March 19, 2020 | By | Reply More
War Of The Maps by Paul McAuley (book review).

There’s a real sense of wonder right from the beginning of Paul McAuley’s new novel ‘War Of The Maps’. Set in the far, far future among an ancient, worn-out civilisation on an artificially created world, it seemed first of all medieval, then maybe Wild West or possibly a little bit steampunk. There’s a hint of […]

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