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Illustrators # 31 (magazine review)

December 16, 2020 | By | Reply More

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace 2020

The latest issue of ‘Illustrators’ is ready to feed you more pleasing images to your eyes.

Jason Edmiston
All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace 2020

Artist Jason Edmiston (1974- ) has got a thing about eyes and doing them to the right scale. He painted a picture of King Kong’s eyes at 8 feet wide by 3 feet high but was shrunk down for this magazine. Fortunately, a lot of his other eye paintings are of a smaller scale but still head size. However, the selection of other paintings here, together with his interview by Diego Cordroba should make your jaw drop. Looking at the list of artists he admires, it’s hardly surprising that he prefers to paint to leave an impression than go for total realism to his photo resource. There is much to love about his work.

Hannes Bok All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace 2020

Hannes Bok, the alias of Wayne Francis Woodard (1914-1964), is known in Science Fiction circles but less so his history, which is given here. I can see why Ray Bradbury liked his art and helped get him jobs, although of course things changed when the pulps went into the decline in the late 1950s. They are certainly provoking and I can see the Maxfield Parrish glazing influence.

Luke Cornillion
All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace 2020

French artist Luc Cornillion (1957- ) as interviewed by Diego Cordroba has a gentle humour to his work and answers to questions and totally endearing. His cartoon-like artwork also expresses this humour so I’m not that surprised or the fact that he works for ‘Metal Hurlant’. It’s also interesting seeing them compare notes as to what he’s seen in France compared to elsewhere.

Mel Crawford
All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace 2020

The look at Mel Crawford (1925-2015) also shows not all artists get recognised. Originally slated to have a life in animation, Crawford ended up illustrating books using the characters from them instead but not allowed to take credit for. His later work on ‘Professor Harbinger’, shown here, also showed he was equally at home with pen and ink. Oddly, the text about him is a little dry although I can sympathise as it was hard to get information about him.

Rowena Morill
All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace 2020

We have the delight art of Rowena Morrill (1944- ), who in her prime was rated next to Frank Frazetta and Boris Vallejo. I was sorry to find out the reason why she stopped illustrating book covers because she burnt out as I delight in her work with its comedy elements and love to know more about the unusual green she frequently used. I would disagree about her books not being available as you can find them on the secondary market. Somehow I missed the first one from 1993 but have found an ordered up a copy. They are out there if you look around. There are also a few pictures I haven’t seen before. Morrill is all the more amazing was because she got into painting in her mid-30s and was proven to be naturally gifted. A real nugget amongst other nuggets.

Diego Cordroba
All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace 2020

Finally, the look at western comicstrips is really a look at Diego Cordroba’s western illustrations. I suspect this was included to remind readers of ‘Illustrator’s editor’s own background.

As always a delight to read and feed on the art. I do think this edition will sell out solely for fans of Rowena Morrill’s art so grab your copy early.

GF Willmetts

December 2020

(pub: The Book Palace, 2020. 98 page illustrated squarebound magazine. Price: £18.00 (UK), $21.99 (US) via Bud Plant. ISBN: 978-1-907081-93-4. ISSN: 2052-6520)

check out website: www.bookpalace.com and www.illustratorsquarterly.com

Category: Illustration, Magazines

About the Author ()

Geoff Willmetts has been editor at SFCrowsnest for some 21 plus years now, showing a versatility and knowledge in not only Science Fiction, but also the sciences and arts, all of which has been displayed here through editorials, reviews, articles and stories. With the latter, he has been running a short story series under the title of ‘Psi-Kicks’ If you want to contribute to SFCrowsnest, read the guidelines and show him what you can do. If it isn’t usable, he spends as much time telling you what the problems is as he would with material he accepts. This is largely how he got called an Uncle, as in Dutch Uncle. He’s not actually Dutch but hails from the west country in the UK.

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