avatar

Author Archive: NealeMonks

rss feed

Chiliad: A Meditation by Clive Barker (book review).

February 9, 2018 | By | Reply More
Chiliad: A Meditation by Clive Barker (book review).

Described as a novella, ‘Chiliad’ is a thoughtful if ultimately ephemeral piece of fiction typical of Clive Barker’s style. Combining moments of gruesome brutality with studied reflections of human nature, the story spans a period of time known as a ‘chiliad’, to wit, one thousand years. A brutal killing one thousand years ago is mirrored […]

Read More

Hawkmoon: The Runestaff by Michael Moorcock (book review).

January 24, 2018 | By | Reply More
Hawkmoon: The Runestaff by Michael Moorcock (book review).

‘The Runestaff’ picks up where ‘The Sword Of The Dawn’ left off, with the chief protagonists, Hawkmoon and D’Averc, sailing back to Europe after their adventures in Amarehk. Rather quickly, they are attacked by sea monsters, driven towards a mysterious island in the ocean and then redirected back to Amarehk by an Orkneyman by the […]

Read More

The Magykal Papers: A Companion To The World Of Septimus Heap by Angie Sage (book review).

December 28, 2017 | By | Reply More
The Magykal Papers: A Companion To The World Of Septimus Heap by Angie Sage (book review).

The ‘Septimus Heap’ series of books are rather like ‘Harry Potter’ in the Discworld universe, but with a more Narnia-esque flavour suited to a pre-teen readership. In other words, the titular character is a young magic user in a fantasy setting and through the series of seven novels, the young Septimus Heap not only has […]

Read More

Terry Pratchett’s Discworld: Imaginarium by Paul Kidby (book review).

December 15, 2017 | By | Reply More
Terry Pratchett’s Discworld: Imaginarium by Paul Kidby (book review).

Few fantasy novelists are as easily associated with their cover art as Terry Pratchett, through the 1980s and 90s with Josh Kirby and, thereafter, with Paul Kidby. Of course, they both had completely different styles and, inevitably, the younger artist went back to Pratchett’s earlier works and created his own illustrations for them. So what […]

Read More

The Science Of Dune edited by Kevin R. Grazier (book review).

December 13, 2017 | By | Reply More
The Science Of Dune edited by Kevin R. Grazier (book review).

A common problem with Science Fiction is that it doesn’t hold up well to scientific scrutiny. Things that make sense superficially, such as faster-than-light travel, don’t really make any sense when thought about scientifically. It’s not that we just don’t how to make spacecraft travel faster than light, it’s more that physics as we understand […]

Read More

The Fangirl’s Guide To The Galaxy by Sam Maggs (book review).

December 5, 2017 | By | Reply More
The Fangirl’s Guide To The Galaxy by Sam Maggs (book review).

While contemporary geek culture often sees itself as progressive and liberal, the reality is that it’s still one where women can struggle to feel completely accepted and at home. That’s a crying shame because, fundamentally, geek culture should be a celebration of precisely the sorts of idealism and diversity that characterise pretty much all modern […]

Read More

Hawkmoon: The Sword Of Dawn by Michael Moorcock (book review).

November 14, 2017 | By | 1 Reply More
Hawkmoon: The Sword Of Dawn by Michael Moorcock (book review).

Michael Moorcock is widely regarded as one of the key figures in the history of British Science Fiction and fantasy, but this reviewer at least came to him relatively recently and the reissuing of this 1968 novel, ‘Hawkmoon: The Sword Of Dawn’, provided the opportunity to decide if Moorcock’s older works are still worth reading. […]

Read More

Harrison Squared by Daryl Gregory (book review).

October 24, 2017 | By | Reply More
Harrison Squared by Daryl Gregory (book review).

In short, ‘Harry Potter’ meets ‘Shadow Over Innsmouth’ pretty much sums up both the themes of the book and its style. On the one hand, many young adult readers will take the book at face value, a coming-of-age story involving a lonely teenager who doesn’t accept the official story about the death of his mother. […]

Read More

The Ice Dragon by George R.R. Martin and illustrated by Luis Royo (book review).

September 20, 2017 | By | Reply More
The Ice Dragon by George R.R. Martin and illustrated by Luis Royo (book review).

George RR Martin is of course best known for his series of fantasy novels widely known as the ‘Game Of Thrones’ universe thanks to the popular television show of that name. But before he’d written even the first of these novels, he’d written a number of other books including a children’s story called ‘The Ice […]

Read More

Noche Roja by Simon Oliver and Jason Latour (graphic novel review).

August 31, 2017 | By | Reply More
Noche Roja by Simon Oliver and Jason Latour (graphic novel review).

‘Noche Roja’ (English translation: ‘Red Night’) is a graphic novel take on the classic hard-boiled, film noir detective genre, but this time set on the Mexican-American border at some vaguely unspecified 1970s/1980s point in time. A number of young Mexican women have been found dead and horribly mutilated, but local law enforcement seems to have […]

Read More

SFcrowsnest

Enjoy scifi? Please spread the word :)