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Author Archive: Gareth D Jones

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The Smoke by Simon Ings (book review).

February 23, 2018 | By | Reply More
The Smoke by Simon Ings (book review).

Simon Ings brings us an alternative Earth in his latest book ‘The Smoke’, where history has diverged at some point from what we know to produce something far more bizarre than usually encountered in alternative histories. This is due to the pivotal event where this world split from our own being a biological discovery rather […]

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Something Coming Through by Paul McAuley (book review).

February 19, 2018 | By | 1 Reply More
Something Coming Through by Paul McAuley (book review).

When the alien Jackaroo come to Earth, they claim to be concerned only with the welfare of mankind. They provide access to fifteen extra-solar planets for mankind to colonise and from these worlds come a steady stream of alien artefacts from the lost Elder Cultures, artefacts that are little understood but that affect people in […]

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Elysium Fire by Alastair Reynolds (book review).

January 25, 2018 | By | Reply More
Elysium Fire by Alastair Reynolds (book review).

I have found all of Alastair Reynolds’ ‘Revelation Space’ books and short stories to be wonderfully atmospheric and perpetually gripping and, out of all of them, the standalone novel ‘The Prefect’, featuring Prefect Tom Dreyfus, was my favourite. On his website, Alastair Reynolds had made a comment that he thought it unlikely that he would […]

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By Light Alone by Adam Roberts (book review).

January 12, 2018 | By | Reply More
By Light Alone by Adam Roberts (book review).

A century or so from now, the problem of famine has been overcome by a technique that transforms hair into solar energy collectors that works by a kind of photosynthesis, so that nobody need eat food any more. This means that the poor must wear their hair long in order to survive, allowing them to […]

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Artemis by Andy Weir (book review).

December 21, 2017 | By | Reply More
Artemis by Andy Weir (book review).

Unlike half of the world’s population, I haven’t read Andy Weir’s debut novel ‘The Martian’, but in common with the other half of the population I did watch the film and rather enjoyed it. Andy Weir returns to the world of populist hard SF with ‘Artemis’ which takes us this time to the Moon, location […]

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The Adjacent by Christopher Priest (book review).

December 6, 2017 | By | Reply More
The Adjacent by Christopher Priest (book review).

I hardly know where to begin in describing Christopher Priest’s ‘The Adjacent’. It’s a multi-stranded novel that alternates the tale of Tibor Tarent, a free-lance photographer in near-future Britain, with a selection of tales from earlier time periods and other places that feel like they are almost related somehow, without making the connection obvious. The […]

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Strange Music (A Pip And Flinx Adventure – book 15) by Alan Dean Foster (book review)

November 23, 2017 | By | Reply More
Strange Music (A Pip And Flinx Adventure – book 15) by Alan Dean Foster  (book review)

A few years back I read the last three books in Alan Dean Foster’s long-running ‘Pip And Flinx’ series, a light-hearted, adventurous series about the empathic Flinx and his pet mini-dragon, Pip. The air of tediousness that enveloped me as I read through them returned to mind when I received this new book which brings […]

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The Time Roads by Beth Bernobich (book review).

November 10, 2017 | By | 1 Reply More
The Time Roads by Beth Bernobich (book review).

The Irish Empire takes the place of the traditional British Empire in ‘The Time Roads’, an alternative history/steampunk tale from Beth Bernobich, set at the turn of the 20th century when European geography and politics are almost familiar yet convincingly different. The book is made up of four linked novellas, three of which have been […]

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Ghost In The Shell by Andrew Osmond (book review).

October 25, 2017 | By | 1 Reply More
Ghost In The Shell by Andrew Osmond (book review).

Probably in common with a lot of the audience who have seen the 2017 live action film ‘Ghost In The Shell’ starring Scarlett Johansson, I was aware that the story originated as a Japanese anime title, but otherwise I had no idea about its background. In fact, my knowledge of the genre is rather paltry […]

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Austral by Paul McAuley (book review).

October 19, 2017 | By | Reply More
Austral by Paul McAuley (book review).

The partly-thawed Antarctic Peninsula seems like an obvious place to set a novel in a globally-warmed future, but it’s never crossed my mind and I can’t say I’ve come across it in any other book before. Paul McAuley describes a wondrous wilderness of retreating glaciers, hardy frontiersmen, burgeoning greenery and blossoming towns that are working […]

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